changes in journalism

The challenges of a 'disrupted' news industry

The challenges of a 'disrupted' news industry

“Bad story selection – or in not so-PC terms – dumb, lazy noise.” That’s how Peter Hamby, the head of news at Snapchat, summed up the biggest threat to the media industry at a panel discussion at the Texas Tribune festival on September 23.

“The homogeneity of news is a real problem. There’s a lack of bravery around telling new stories,” he added.

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Spotlight is alive

Spotlight is alive

I still remember clearly the thoughts in my head after I watched the movie Spotlight. It was a perfect 2 hours and 8 minutes – an ideal romantic image of what journalism should be like. The ideal romantic image of the deeply passionate journalist whose work brings important change. Now, in the time of fast clicks and 24-hour news cycle, investigative journalism is more of a luxury for financially starving newsrooms.

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How journalists work during the hurricanes

How journalists work during the hurricanes

This week our team visited the Miami Herald. The newspaper’s journalists were at the forefront during Hurricane Irma.

During the hurricane, many staff worked long hours to cover the events and help residents understand what was happening and how to prepare.

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A hurricane reporter shares his best advice: Remember baby wipes and four other tips

A hurricane reporter shares his best advice: Remember baby wipes and four other tips

 

News on weather and extreme weather conditions interest people more than ever, and the Miami Herald notices. Even stories on the popularity of weather news attracts online readers. I will come back to this later.

Man made Star Island in Miami Beach. Irma left behind piles of fallen palm tree leaves. 

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Disconnect between news, editorial teams unhealthy

U.S. newspapers are impressively “hanging on” despite a sustained onslaught by online media. All the top brands are no doubt feeling the pinch.

Print newspapers have lost nearly 52 per cent of their daily sales volumes, while online channels have registered an exponential growth in reach, almost three-fold in the last six years. But as the news media struggles to weather the storm created by changes in consumer behavior, not to mention sustained attacks by President Donald Trump, some pertinent issues have come up that require urgent deliberations by industry stakeholders.

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Is a journalism museum worth fighting for?

Is a journalism museum worth fighting for?

 

A museum dedicated to the freedom of expression – one of five freedoms enshrined in the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution –  called the Newseum, in Washington, D.C., is undergoing a “strategic review” and may have to close due to financial difficulties, it was revealed last week.

The announcement, which coincided with the resignation of the museum’s president and CEO, received a mixed reception from the local media industry.

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Because we like you!

Because we like you!

At the age of 75 in Oct.12, 2003 Joan Beverly Kroc dies. As the third wife of McDonald's CEO Ray Kroc, she inherited his fortune after his death in 1984. During her life Mrs. Kroc gave away more than $1 billion toward causes ranging from animal welfare, children, homelessness, nuclear disarmament, and the arts.

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Minnesota Public Radio and its investigation team

Minnesota Public Radio and its investigation team

On August 30, the WFP had the opportunity to visit Minnesota Public Radio (MPR) and get acquainted with the work of its investigation team.

MPR is one of the nation's premier public radio stations producing programs for radio, digital and live audiences and operating a 46-stations radio network. MPR and its three regional services - MPR News, Classical MPR and The Current - reach one million listeners each week.

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The future lab

Many editors in Europe share this overwhelming and slightly disheartening belief that if anything happens to newspapers in the United States, it will sooner or later happen elswhere, too. Rather than being an inevitable destiny, it is a self-fulfilling prophecy: newspapers copy American solutions, and often create similar challenges. In that sense, the American media market is an experimental playground for the rest of the world.

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